"There is no sworde to bee feared more than the Learned pen"

Archive for the ‘EYEONCITRUS.COM’ Category

5G Wireless Coronavirus Connection Expose

In 5G Wireless, Coronavirus Connection Expose, EYEONCITRUS.COM on kp24 at 302011
Stories about the Wuhan outbreak of Corona virus are now getting so crazy that it’s rather difficult to see the real truth about what’s been going on there.

Is there a connection between the reported outbreak of COVID-19 Coronavirus in Wuhan and the fact that Wuhan was a model city for demonstrating 5G wireless technology in China?

Is it just a coincidence that the crippling health effects known about 5G wireless technology were in effect in a full scale deployment in Wuhan starting October 31, 2019?

These are some of the questions we will attempt to address here in this expose:

5G Wireless Coronavirus Connection Exposed

There has been a whirlwind of speculation about the Coronavirus COVID-19 (2019-nCoV) being a bioweapon. While there is quite a bit of evidence that this coronavirus has features that point toward a man-made virus this doesn’t mean that there’s not also a connection between this “outbreak” and the 5G Wuhan test city.

In getting to the meat of this hypothesis it’s important to start with what we know that 5G wireless can do to your immune system.

5G as well as plenty of other non-ionizing radiation sources affect the voltage gated ion channels in your cellular and mitochondrial membranes. What this means is that the non-ionizing radiation puts extra forces on the voltage gate that is designed to protect your cells and keep them in balance.

This additional force or pressure that’s put on the voltage gate opens the “gate” and throws off the balance of the cell.

Keep in mind that the cellular mem-brane is actually considered by many biologists to be the “brain” of the cell. It’s thought of this way because this “brain” is the regulator of the cell as it knows what ions to let in and when, as well as what to let out of the cell and when.

Putting more voltage pressure on this gate actually has catastrophic effects. These effects are in some cases irreversible. To dig deeper into this subject you can check out the Dr Martin Pall presentation which we hosted when he visited us. He’s researched this subject for many years and published extensive journal articles on it which you can also find on PubMed if you are into that sort of research.

Now let’s discuss what 5G really is…

5G deployment (a military term which is used in all discussion of 5G!) involves installation of thousands of small cell transmitter antennas along with specially designed LED streetlights in cities where full scale 5G network access is being sold. These transmitters and LED streetlight work in conjunction with each other to provide the network access utilizing an array of different frequency bands for different purposes.

Some of the frequencies used in 5G networks are sub-Gigahertz which corresponds with much of the 4G LTE networks while other much higher frequencies at 28 Gigahertz and higher are used for massive data compression short distance communication. Because these higher frequencies are limited to shorter distance transmission capability and are easily blocked by any physical object whether it’s a tree or the wall on a building, many more small cells are needed in a city in order to deploy full scall, high bandwidth 5G.

More small cells means a denser background of non-ionizing radiation everywhere which is why you hear 5G being discussed as the “densification” of wireless technology. In order for it to work the background radiation in any city must be much higher than it’s ever been with previous technologies.

As you can see higher intensity background radiation in a city means that 5G affects everyone whether you use it or not.

And for this reason it also affects your sensitive voltage gates on your cellular and mitochondrial membranes.

Other reports explain this as opening up your skin, and while this is part of the issue it’s not JUST your skin that’s affected.

We can think of our skin as the membrane that is protecting our internal structure but these forces will penetrate throughout your body as even if we think higher frequencies may have a stronger effect on the first few millimeters of our skin, the associate EMF will penetrate throughout your body and essentially ring your internal organs with the same frequency of the radiation.

Here’s the bottom line, it’s not a surprise to the scientists that study the effects of EMF that 5G deployment has already been shown to cause flu-like symptoms in the populations that’s exposed to it.

After all the frequencies used in 5G networks are much the same as those used in the Active Denial System used for crowd control which I reported on a few years ago. Considering those systems made people feel like their “skin was on fire” forcing an immediate response to run away it’s not to surprising the type of effects that it may have caused in Wuhan.

Harmful effects of RF-EMF exposure are already proven
Over 230 scientists from more than 40 countries have expressed their “serious concerns” regarding the ubiquitous and increasing exposure to EMF generated by electric and wireless devices already before the additional 5G roll-out. They refer to the fact that ”numerous recent scientific publications have shown that EMF affects living organisms at levels well below most international and national guidelines”. Effects include increased cancer risk, cellular stress, increase in harmful free radicals, genetic damages, structural and functional changes of the reproductive system, learning and memory deficits, neurological disorders, and negative impacts on general well-being in humans. Damage goes well beyond the human race, as there is growing evidence of harmful effects to both plants and animals.

from Scientist and doctors warn of potential serious health effects of 5G (5G Appeal) Continue reading here!

David Gregory’s Resume

In David Gregory’s Resume, EYEONCITRUS.COM on kp24 at 312019
David Gregory
Champlain Business College
Burlington, Vermont
Accounting
NASA
Quality Control Inspector
Lunar Lander Module
Simmonds Precision
Vergennes, Vermont
Castleton State College
Castleton, Vermont
BA Sociology 1977
Substitute Teacher
Citrus County, Florida
Crystal River High School
Lecanto High School
Hernando Elementary
Liberty Delivery
Homosassa, Florida
Citrus County Property Appraiser’s Office
Inverness & Crystal River Florida

DONORBOX

Champlain Business College Burlington VT Accounting Quality Control Inspector NASA Apollo Lunar Lander Module Simmonds Precision Vergennes VT Castleton State College BA Sociology Castleton VT 1977 Substitute Teacher Citrus County CR High School, Lecanto High School & Hernando Elementary Liberty Delivery Homosassa FL 18 years Citrus County Property Appraiser Field Appraiser Retired 2017 14 years After Champlain Business College on the shores of Lake Champlain where I study bookkeeping (accounting) I went to work for a contractor (Simmonds Precision) in Vermont that was chosen by NASA to build the fuel gauges for Apollo’s Lunar Landing Module and I became a Quality Control Inspector for the assembled fuel gauges for the Lander.

There were 6 of them 3 for each propulsion unit. Redundancy was the name of that game. My Inspection stamp may be on the moon! After a government contract was cancelled I was laid off. Owning and operating The Store, in Whiting VT which was an Amoco gas station and country store and it had an apartment over the store making it a perfect fit while I attended college at Castleton State College during the day and came home and ran the The Store and gas station at night for four years while obtaining my B.A. in Sociology with a minor in Education. Taking a sabbatical after College to come to Florida, postponing my LSAT’s in preparation for law school, is where I meet my beautiful wife, Corl, who was working as a breakfast manager at Burger King and soon Vermont and the LSAT’s were forgotten. I met Bessie Reese of the Citrus County School Board and she suggested that I substitute teach while deciding where I wanted to work, which I did for a few years teaching at Crystal River High School, Lecanto High School and Hernando Elementary School. Working as a private contractor for Citrus County for 18 years, as owner-operator of Liberty Delivery with 15- 20 employees, we delivered all the county agenda’s and other documents to the various boards and offices of the county as well as other deliveries in and out of Citrus County included but not limited to, doctor offices for labs specimens, transporting medical equipment between the two hospitals in the county during their early reconstruction, Damron’s Parts (LKQ), etc. After missing 8 weeks work in 2005 because of my open heart surgery I went back to work at the Citrus County Property Appraiser’s Office and worked the next 14 years in a power chair that I plan to continue using when elected Property Appraiser. Working for 14 years in the Citrus County Property Appraisers Office, retiring as a Field Appraiser and having 32 years accumulated experience with the intricacies of Citrus County government in all areas puts me an in unparalleled position to take over the reins of property appraiser.

The One War That the Human Species Can’t Lose

In EYEONCITRUS.COM, The One War That the Human Species Can’t Lose on kp24 at 292023

Glacier.

By Robin Wright

February 20, 2020

The ice in Antarctica is melting six times faster than it did forty years ago, resulting in more calving of icebergs—with existential stakes.Photograph by Robin Wright

Sign up for Bill McKibben’s new Climate Crisis newsletter and get weekly updates from inside the climate movement.

On the final day of my expedition to Antarctica last year, ten of us set out on a Zodiac to tour dozens of icebergs in nature’s wondrous ocean museum. The frozen sculptures glistened in exquisite hues of blue and cyan; iceberg colors vary by the density of air bubbles. Each was formed after snapping off an ancient glacier. The iceberg that sank the Titanic in the Atlantic, in 1912, was considered a mere “bergy bit,” or a smaller piece of floating ice; it melted within a couple of years. The ones we saw around Antarctica were massive. Occasionally, we spotted blubbery elephant seals (which can weigh more than four tons) napping on icebergs, or Adélie penguins (so named by a French explorer, for his wife) leaping among them, or a Humpback whale’s blow unnervingly nearby. As we headed back to the ship, the naturalist steering the Zodiac suddenly turned off the motor. “Listen,” he said. Antarctica is usually a powerfully silent continent except for the gusting winds or the lapping waves on its coastline. He put his finger up, signalling to wait for it. We sat motionless. A thundering crack then ripped through the air, echoing across the water until it felt like it was going off inside my head. We watched a towering slice of the continent break off and crash into the Southern Ocean. It felt cataclysmic.

For almost a half century, I’ve covered wars, revolutions and uprisings on four continents, many for years on end. I’ve always been an outside observer watching as others killed each other. I lamented the loss of human life—and the warring parties’ self-destructive practices—from an emotional distance. In Antarctica, I saw war through a different prism. And I was the enemy. “Humans will be but a blip in the span of Earth’s history,” Wayne Ranney, a naturalist and geologist on the expedition, told me. “The only question is how long the blip will be.”

Last week, the temperature in Antarctica hit almost seventy degrees—the hottest in recorded history. It wasn’t a one-day fluke. Famed for its snowscapes, the Earth’s coldest, wildest, windiest, highest, and most mysterious continent has been experiencing a heat wave. A few days earlier, an Antarctic weather station recorded temperatures in the mid-sixties. It was colder in Washington, D.C., where I live. Images of northern Antarctica captured vast swaths of barren brown terrain devoid of ice and with only small puddle-like patches of snow.

The problem is not whether a new record was set, “it’s the longer-term trend that makes those records more likely to happen more often,” John Nielsen-Gammon, the director of the Texas Center for Climate Studies at Texas A. & M. University, told me this week. “It’s sort of like a forest where trees are constantly growing and trees are dying, but if they start dying faster than they can grow back, then you eventually lose the forest,” he said. “The same thing applies to glaciers. Glaciers flow out to the ocean and break off, but if they break off faster then the glacier retreats and you lose ice—and then the sea level goes up around the world.”

The iceberg that I watched break off from Antarctica was part of a process called calving. It’s normal and a necessary step in nature’s cycle, except that it’s now happening a lot faster and in larger chunks—with existential stakes. The ice in Antarctica is now melting six times faster than it did forty years ago, Eric Rignot, an Earth scientist at the University of California, Irvine, and a co-author of a major study of the continent’s ice health, told me.

This month, an iceberg measuring more than a hundred square miles—the size of the Mediterranean island of Malta, or twice the size of Washington, D.C.—broke off the Pine Island Glacier (lovingly known as PIG, for short) in West Antarctica. It then broke up into smaller “pig-lets,” according to the European Space Agency, which tracked them by satellite. The largest piglet was almost forty square miles. Rest of  Article HERE

Withlacoochee River Elect Unclaimed Credits

In EYEONCITRUS.COM on kp15 at 301910

Withlacoochee River Elect has UNCLAIMED CREDITS available BUT ONLY till the beginning of Dec so you don’t have much time. Here’s the LINK will open a .pdf  You can search your last name first and first name LAST, ex: Smith John. Open pdf file and hold control key down on keyboard and the letter “f” then type in your name as outlined above.

Fort Island Gulf Beached Closed

In EYEONCITRUS.COM on kp07 at 301910

Fort Island Gulf Beach

Fort island Gulf Beached Closed until further notice, boat ramp still available. this is being done as a precautionary measure.

Richard “Rick” Schroeder files for Property Appraiser without documentation?

In EYEONCITRUS.COM on kp58 at 301905

Richard “Rick” Schroeder files as an NPA candidate for property appraiser in Citrus County. Questions arise as to whether he will have to resign from his position with the Citrus County Property Appraiser office as required by the Citrus County Property Appraiser’s Employee Manual? These questions wait to be answered. Although the Supervisor of Elections shows he has not filed any of the necessary documentation which is required according to State Law to accompanied this filing as displayed today Tuesday 11.5.2019  on the screen copy of the Supervisor of Elections website shown below. A link to the page of candidates is here check and see IF and WHEN the appropriate paperwork appears on the Susan Gill, Supervisor of Elections website page!

image

Florida Closed Primary State HOWEVER

In EYEONCITRUS.COM, Florida Closed Primary State HOWEVER on kp31 at 301903

image

When the August 2020 Primaries roll around an interesting and mostly unknown exception might come about!

In most closed primary states it’s pretty much what the name implies. you have to be of that particular party in order to vote in that primary, Republicans vote in the Republican primary, Democrats in their primary and other affiliations in whatever  particular party they may be designated.

However, in Florida there are times when all registered voters can vote in a primary election, regardless of which major or minor political party they are registered or even if they are registered without a specific party affiliation:

  1. If all the candidates for an office have the same party affiliation and the winner of the primary election will not face any opposition in the general election (i.e. no write-in candidates have qualified), then all registered voters can vote for any of the candidates for that office in the primary election.
  2. If races for nonpartisan (i.e., free from party affiliation) judicial and school board offices, nonpartisan special districts or local referendum questions are on the primary election ballot, then all registered voters, including those without party affiliation are entitled to vote those races on the ballot.

FOOD PANTRY CITRUS COUNTY FLORIDA

In EYEONCITRUS.COM, Food Pantry Citrus County Florida on kp34 at 311929

food programs

Food Pantries in Citrus County Florida

— Daystar Life Center — 9 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Monday through Friday (excluding holidays), 6751 W. Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Crystal River. 352-795-8668. Food for dogs and cats may also be available. Other assistance available. A community service resource.

— First Baptist Church of Homosassa Life Care Center — 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. Mondays and Thursdays for bread distribution at 10540 W. Yulee Drive, Homosassa. Homosassa residents may receive a bag of canned and dry goods once a month. Call 352-628-3858.

— A food pantry is provided by St. Timothy Lutheran Church and Life Tree Church from 9:30 a.m. to noon the second and fourth Tuesdays monthly at Life Tree Church on U.S. 19 in Crystal River.

— For those in need, the food pantry and Beyond the Bread ministries at North Oak Baptist Church are open from 5 to 7 p.m. the second Tuesday monthly and from 10 a.m. to noon the fourth Saturday monthly. The food pantry provides vegetables, meats, prepared foods and more. Beyond the Bread provides nonfood items such as laundry detergent, toilet paper, paper towels, some cleaning supplies, personal items and more. Folks are asked to visit only one of those times, once a month, to enable the ministries to serve more people. NOBC is at 9324 N. Elkcam Blvd. in Citrus Springs. For more information, call 352-489-1688.

— St. Anne’s Episcopal Church — 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday in the administration building, 9870 W. Fort Island Trail, Crystal River. Call 352-795-2176.

— Citrus United Basket (CUB) — 9 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Monday through Friday, 1201 Parkside Ave., Inverness, to assist Citrus County residents facing temporary hardship. Call 352-344-2242 or go online to citrusunitedbasket.org.

— First Baptist Church of Crystal River — 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Monday, Wednesday and Thursday, 700 N. Citrus Ave. Call 352-795-3367.

— Our Lady of Fatima — 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Monday through Friday, 604 U.S. 41 S., open to needy residents of Floral City, Hernando and Inverness. Call 352-726-1707.

— The Citrus County Veterans Coalition’s food pantry, for veterans and their families, operates from 9 a.m. to noon Tuesdays and the first and third Thursdays (excluding holidays) on the DAV lot at 1039 N. Paul Drive in Inverness, just west of U.S. 41, on Independence Highway. The pantry offers a variety of dry, canned and frozen goods (cereals, rice, canned vegetables, soups and meats) for veterans in need. For food assistance, call Linda Enlow at 352-220-6754, see a member at one of CCVC’s flea markets, or ask a volunteer during food pantry hours.

— Our Lady of Grace Catholic Church — 9 to 10 a.m. the third Tuesday monthly, 6 Roosevelt Blvd. Call 352-746-2144.

— St. Margaret’s Episcopal Church — 9:30 to 11:45 a.m. Tuesdays and Wednesdays. Call 352-726-3153.

— First Presbyterian Church of Crystal River — 9:30 a.m. to noon the second and fourth Tuesdays monthly, 1501 SE U.S. 19. Call 352-795-2259.

— Suncoast Baptist Church — food pantry open for bread distribution from 7:30 to 9:30 a.m. Wednesdays, and the second Wednesday monthly is distribution of bagged canned goods, dry goods and meat from 7:30 to 9:30 a.m. at 5310 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa Springs. Open to Homosassa residents only.

— Homosassa First United Methodist Church Bread of Life Pantry — 8 to 11 a.m. Thursdays in fellowship hall. Bag of groceries with bread, meat and produce available for Homosassa residents once a month. Call 352-628-4083.

— Serving our Savior (SOS) — 8:30 to 11 a.m. Thursdays at Good Shepherd Lutheran Church, 439 E. Norvell Bryant Highway, Hernando. Call 352-513-5857 or sosfoodpantry@gmail.com.

— Calvary Church — 10 a.m. to noon Thursdays, 2728 E. Harley St., Inverness. Photo ID and proof of Citrus County residency are required. Visitors can receive food once per month. Calvary Church is an equal opportunity provider.

— Calvary Chapel of Inverness — Free bagged groceries available from noon to 2 p.m. Thursdays at 960 S. U.S. 41. 352-726-1480. Calvary Church is an equal opportunity provider.

— Floral City First Baptist Church — 1 to 3 p.m. the third Thursday monthly. Proof of residency required.

FREE MEALS

— Peace Lutheran Church offers a free community meal from 4:30 to 6:30 p.m. the third Monday monthly. This is not a fundraiser and there is no charge. Come be our guest(s). We care and you are important to us. All ages are welcome. The Aug. 19 meal will be spaghetti and Bolognese meat sauce, salad, garlic bread, dessert and drink. For more information, call 352-489-5881. Peace Lutheran Church (“The Church on the Hill”) is at 7201 U.S. 41 South in Dunnellon.

— Free hot meals are available Monday through Friday for clients ages 60-plus at the following community centers. Call to reserve your first meal as a visitor: Central Citrus Community Center at 2804 W. Marc Knighton Court in Lecanto (352-527-5993); West Citrus Community Center at 8940 W. Veterans Drive in Homosassa (352-795-3831); East Citrus Community Center at 9907 E. Gulf-to-Lake Highway in Inverness (352-344-9666); and from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Inverness Community Center at 1082 N. Paul Drive in Inverness (352-726-1009).

— Inverness First United Methodist Church — Provides a free hot meal to everyone from 11:30 a.m. on Mondays at 1140 Turner Camp Road, Inverness. Call 352-726-2522.

— Floral City United Methodist Church — 7 to 9 a.m. Tuesdays in Hilton Hall, 8478 E. Marvin St. Call 352-344-1771.

— St. Margaret’s Episcopal Church’s Feed My Sheep outreach — 11:30 a.m. Wednesdays. Call 352-726-3153.

— Our Father’s Table — 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. the second, third, fourth and fifth Saturdays monthly at St. Anne’s Episcopal Church, one mile west of the Plantation Inn on West Fort Island Trail. Call 352-795-2176.

GIVEAWAYS

— El-Shaddai food ministries “brown bag of food” distribution is from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Tuesdays at Crystal River Church of God, 2180 W. 12th Ave. Although food is distributed once a week, families are only eligible for food once a month. Call 352-628-9087 or 352-302-9925.

— Hernando Seventh-day Adventist Church, 1880 N. Trucks Ave., Hernando, provides food distribution for needy families from 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. the second Tuesday monthly. Call 352-212-5159.

— Christ Christian Bible Ministry distributes food at 1 p.m. Wednesdays at 619 NE Second St., Crystal River. Preparations are being made to provide a hot meal once a week. Call 352-513-8065.

California against the sea

In EYEONCITRUS.COM on kp20 at 311909

By Rosanna Xia

The California coast grew and prospered during a remarkable moment in history when the sea was at its tamest.

A California Beach not very enticing??

But the mighty Pacific, unbeknownst to all, was nearing its final years of a calm but unusual cycle that had lulled dreaming settlers into a false sense of endless summer.

Elsewhere, Miami has been drowning, Louisiana shrinking, North Carolina’s beaches disappearing like a time lapse with no ending. While other regions grappled with destructive waves and rising seas, the West Coast for decades was spared by a rare confluence of favorable winds and cooler water. This “sea level rise suppression,” as scientists call it, went largely undetected. Blinded from the consequences of a warming planet, Californians kept building right to the water’s edge.

But lines in the sand are meant to shift. In the last 100 years, the sea rose less than 9 inches in California. By the end of this century, the surge could be greater than 9 feet.

Wildfire and drought dominate the climate change debates in the state. Yet this less-talked-about reality has California cornered. The coastline is eroding with every tide and storm, but everything built before we knew better — Pacific Coast Highway, multimillion-dollar homes in Malibu, the rail line to San Diego — is fixed in place with nowhere to go.

But the world is getting hotter, the great ice sheets still melting, the rising ocean a slow-moving disaster that has already swept past California’s front door. Seaside cliffs are crumbling in Pacifica, bringing down entire buildings. Balboa Island, barely above sea level, is spending $1.8 million to raise the wall that separates it from the ocean.

Winter storms pummeled a Capistrano Beach boardwalk, turning the idyllic shoreline into a construction zone as bulldozers rushed to stack boulders into a barricade. From San Diego to Humboldt counties, homeowners scramble to fend off increasing erosion and storm surges, pleading with officials for bigger seawalls that can hold back the even bigger ocean. Rest of story here

Homosassa Man Dies Parking Lot Race Track Sunday

In EYEONCITRUS.COM on kp46 at 301911

A Homosassa man died Sunday evening in a hospital after being injured earlier that morning when a truck rear-ended his bicycle in the parking lot of a RaceTrac gas station.

Following the 8:43 a.m. collision at the RaceTrac on the corner of U.S. 19 and West Homosassa Trail, medics transported Jeromy Landon Bresler to Ocala Regional Medical Center with serious injuries, according to a Florida Highway Patrol (FHP) crash report.

Bresler later died at 6:07 p.m. He was 36.

According to FHP’s report, Bresler rode into the gas station’s parking lot ahead of a southbound Chevrolet pickup driven by 32-year-old Weeki Wachee resident Jamie Jo Fox-Brady, who didn’t see Bresler and collided with the back of his bicycle.

FHP reported that alcohol was not involved. Charges are pending.

%d bloggers like this: