"There is no sworde to bee feared more than the Learned pen"

The One War That the Human Species Can’t Lose

In EYEONCITRUS.COM, The One War That the Human Species Can’t Lose on kp24 at 292023

Glacier.

By Robin Wright

February 20, 2020

The ice in Antarctica is melting six times faster than it did forty years ago, resulting in more calving of icebergs—with existential stakes.Photograph by Robin Wright

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On the final day of my expedition to Antarctica last year, ten of us set out on a Zodiac to tour dozens of icebergs in nature’s wondrous ocean museum. The frozen sculptures glistened in exquisite hues of blue and cyan; iceberg colors vary by the density of air bubbles. Each was formed after snapping off an ancient glacier. The iceberg that sank the Titanic in the Atlantic, in 1912, was considered a mere “bergy bit,” or a smaller piece of floating ice; it melted within a couple of years. The ones we saw around Antarctica were massive. Occasionally, we spotted blubbery elephant seals (which can weigh more than four tons) napping on icebergs, or Adélie penguins (so named by a French explorer, for his wife) leaping among them, or a Humpback whale’s blow unnervingly nearby. As we headed back to the ship, the naturalist steering the Zodiac suddenly turned off the motor. “Listen,” he said. Antarctica is usually a powerfully silent continent except for the gusting winds or the lapping waves on its coastline. He put his finger up, signalling to wait for it. We sat motionless. A thundering crack then ripped through the air, echoing across the water until it felt like it was going off inside my head. We watched a towering slice of the continent break off and crash into the Southern Ocean. It felt cataclysmic.

For almost a half century, I’ve covered wars, revolutions and uprisings on four continents, many for years on end. I’ve always been an outside observer watching as others killed each other. I lamented the loss of human life—and the warring parties’ self-destructive practices—from an emotional distance. In Antarctica, I saw war through a different prism. And I was the enemy. “Humans will be but a blip in the span of Earth’s history,” Wayne Ranney, a naturalist and geologist on the expedition, told me. “The only question is how long the blip will be.”

Last week, the temperature in Antarctica hit almost seventy degrees—the hottest in recorded history. It wasn’t a one-day fluke. Famed for its snowscapes, the Earth’s coldest, wildest, windiest, highest, and most mysterious continent has been experiencing a heat wave. A few days earlier, an Antarctic weather station recorded temperatures in the mid-sixties. It was colder in Washington, D.C., where I live. Images of northern Antarctica captured vast swaths of barren brown terrain devoid of ice and with only small puddle-like patches of snow.

The problem is not whether a new record was set, “it’s the longer-term trend that makes those records more likely to happen more often,” John Nielsen-Gammon, the director of the Texas Center for Climate Studies at Texas A. & M. University, told me this week. “It’s sort of like a forest where trees are constantly growing and trees are dying, but if they start dying faster than they can grow back, then you eventually lose the forest,” he said. “The same thing applies to glaciers. Glaciers flow out to the ocean and break off, but if they break off faster then the glacier retreats and you lose ice—and then the sea level goes up around the world.”

The iceberg that I watched break off from Antarctica was part of a process called calving. It’s normal and a necessary step in nature’s cycle, except that it’s now happening a lot faster and in larger chunks—with existential stakes. The ice in Antarctica is now melting six times faster than it did forty years ago, Eric Rignot, an Earth scientist at the University of California, Irvine, and a co-author of a major study of the continent’s ice health, told me.

This month, an iceberg measuring more than a hundred square miles—the size of the Mediterranean island of Malta, or twice the size of Washington, D.C.—broke off the Pine Island Glacier (lovingly known as PIG, for short) in West Antarctica. It then broke up into smaller “pig-lets,” according to the European Space Agency, which tracked them by satellite. The largest piglet was almost forty square miles. Rest of  Article HERE

Jan 20 2020 Enjoyed our Day at The Martin Luther King Day in Crystal River FL

In David Gregory Republican Candidate for Citrus County Property Appraiser, Martin Luther King Day on kp18 at 292005

David Gregory Republican 4

David Gregory Republican Candidate for Citrus County Property Appraiser, having gone to the Martin Luther King Day Celebration in Crystal River on Jan 20 2020, a cold bright sunny day, that may have played a part in there being few along the parade route to Copeland Park, I met many friendly people and enjoyed the wonderful chicken that Mr. Bunch prepared for everyone. Using a new camera I hadn’t accustomed myself with it’s operation but I still managed to get some good footage. Amanda from the Jacksonville FBI office gave a informative presentation explaining how the FBI was much better today than it had been earlier in it’s history referring to it’s Civil Rights neglect in the past. A Donation button will be on EyeOnCitrus.com where this video will be posted.

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Attention: Governor Ron DeSantis, Attorney General Ashley Moody, Ethics Commissioner Chris Anderson, Division of Elections Tallahassee FL

My Father Bernard L. Gregory passed in 2008 on my Birthday May 30th, A Strong Military Family

In David Gregory Republican Candidate for Citrus County Property Appraiser, My Father Bernard L. Gregory passed in 2008 on my Birthday May 30th, Strong Military Family on kp51 at 312024

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My father, Bernard L. Gregory enlisted in the Service after Pearl Harbor, he joined the 101st Airborne, The Screaming Eagles, and jump on D Day in Normandy, he fought in the Battle of the Bulge, when the Commander told the Nazi Commander who had our troops surrounded and asked to surrender by the Nazi commander, “NUTS”, here is the US ARMY official details: This is the English version of the message: "December 22nd 1944 To the U.S.A. Commander of the encircled town of Bastogne. The fortune of war is changing. This time the U.S.A. forces in and near Bastogne have been encircled by strong German armored units. More German armored units have crossed the river Our the near Ortheuville, have taken Marche and reached St. Hubert by passing through Hompre-Sibret-Tillet. Libramont is in German hands. There is only one possibility to save the encircled U.S.A troops from total annihilation: that is the honorable surrender of the encircled town. In order to think it over a term of two hours will be granted beginning with the presentation of this note. If this proposal should be rejected one German Artillery Corps and six heavy A. A. Battalions are ready to annihilate the U.S.A. troops in and near Bastogne. The order for firing will be given immediately after this two hours’ term. All the serious civilian losses caused by this artillery fire would not correspond with the wellknown American humanity. The German Commander." The Division Operations Officer, Lt. Col. Harry Kinnard recalled that McAulliffe initially asked, "They want to surrender?" Moore told him, "No sir, they want us to surrender." McAulliffe arose and erupted in anger, which shocked those looking on. He took the paper, looked at it, said "Us surrender, aw nuts!" and dropped it on the floor. Maj. Jones was dismissed. McAulliffe then left the Headquarters to go congratulate a unit on the Western perimeter that had successfully taken out a German road block earlier that morning. When Jones left the Headquarters, he went back to the F Company Command Post and spoke with the two German officers. When he returned to his Regimental Headquarters, he phoned the division headquarters. Upon returning to the division headquarters, McAulliffe was informed that Jones had phoned to say that the two German officers were still waiting at the F Company Command Post. Since they brought a formal demand they felt they were entitled to a formal reply and they were to return to the German lines two hours after delivering their message. McAulliffe asked that Col. Harper be summoned to the Division Headquarters. Harper, who was still inspecting his units’ positions, was contacted by radio. When Harper arrived at the Headquarters, he was asked to wait outside of the closed door to McAulliffe’s quarters. Inside, in the presence of his staff, McAulliffe wondered aloud, "Well, I don’t know what to tell them." At that point, Kinnard said, "What you said initially would be hard to beat." McAulliffe asked "What do you mean?" Kinnard, said, "Sir, you said nuts." All members of the staff enthusiastically agreed, so McAulliffe wrote it down on a message pad and said, "Have it typed up." The reply was typed up, centered on a full sheet of paper. It read: "December 22, 1944 To the German Commander, N U T S ! The American Commander" Our family military experience doesn’t not end there, after the Irag invasion of Kuwait Iraqi president Saddam Hussein ordered the invasion and occupation of neighboring Kuwait in early August 1990. Alarmed by these actions, fellow Arab powers such as Saudi Arabia and Egypt called on the United States and other Western nations to intervene. Hussein defied United Nations Security Council demands to withdraw from Kuwait by mid-January 1991, and the Persian Gulf War began with a massive U.S.-led air offensive known as Operation Desert Storm. After 42 days of relentless attacks by the allied coalition in the air and on the ground, U.S. President George H.W. Bush declared a cease-fire on February 28; by that time, most Iraqi forces in Kuwait had either surrendered or fled. Though the Persian Gulf War was initially considered an unqualified success for the international coalition, simmering conflict in the troubled region led to a second Gulf War–known as the Iraq War–that began in 2003. My son James Gregory, joined the Army, he was not sent sent overseas during Desert Storm, Zachary Gregory was in Irag after the fall of the Twin Towers and served 16 months over there and my grandson Mark Gregory who joined the Marines and served two 8 months tours in Iraq. They all are in this video at the National Cemetery in Bushnell, FL David Gregory

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Post Script: Dad had a total of 69 jumps from a perfectly good airplane!

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