"There is no sworde to bee feared more than the Learned pen"

David Gregory’s Resume

In David Gregory’s Resume, EYEONCITRUS.COM on kp24 at 312019
David Gregory
Champlain Business College
Burlington, Vermont
Accounting
NASA
Quality Control Inspector
Lunar Lander Module
Simmonds Precision
Vergennes, Vermont
Castleton State College
Castleton, Vermont
BA Sociology 1977
Substitute Teacher
Citrus County, Florida
Crystal River High School
Lecanto High School
Hernando Elementary
Liberty Delivery
Homosassa, Florida
Citrus County Property Appraiser’s Office
Inverness & Crystal River Florida

DONORBOX

Champlain Business College Burlington VT Accounting Quality Control Inspector NASA Apollo Lunar Lander Module Simmonds Precision Vergennes VT Castleton State College BA Sociology Castleton VT 1977 Substitute Teacher Citrus County CR High School, Lecanto High School & Hernando Elementary Liberty Delivery Homosassa FL 18 years Citrus County Property Appraiser Field Appraiser Retired 2017 14 years After Champlain Business College on the shores of Lake Champlain where I study bookkeeping (accounting) I went to work for a contractor (Simmonds Precision) in Vermont that was chosen by NASA to build the fuel gauges for Apollo’s Lunar Landing Module and I became a Quality Control Inspector for the assembled fuel gauges for the Lander.

There were 6 of them 3 for each propulsion unit. Redundancy was the name of that game. My Inspection stamp may be on the moon! After a government contract was cancelled I was laid off. Owning and operating The Store, in Whiting VT which was an Amoco gas station and country store and it had an apartment over the store making it a perfect fit while I attended college at Castleton State College during the day and came home and ran the The Store and gas station at night for four years while obtaining my B.A. in Sociology with a minor in Education. Taking a sabbatical after College to come to Florida, postponing my LSAT’s in preparation for law school, is where I meet my beautiful wife, Corl, who was working as a breakfast manager at Burger King and soon Vermont and the LSAT’s were forgotten. I met Bessie Reese of the Citrus County School Board and she suggested that I substitute teach while deciding where I wanted to work, which I did for a few years teaching at Crystal River High School, Lecanto High School and Hernando Elementary School. Working as a private contractor for Citrus County for 18 years, as owner-operator of Liberty Delivery with 15- 20 employees, we delivered all the county agenda’s and other documents to the various boards and offices of the county as well as other deliveries in and out of Citrus County included but not limited to, doctor offices for labs specimens, transporting medical equipment between the two hospitals in the county during their early reconstruction, Damron’s Parts (LKQ), etc. After missing 8 weeks work in 2005 because of my open heart surgery I went back to work at the Citrus County Property Appraiser’s Office and worked the next 14 years in a power chair that I plan to continue using when elected Property Appraiser. Working for 14 years in the Citrus County Property Appraisers Office, retiring as a Field Appraiser and having 32 years accumulated experience with the intricacies of Citrus County government in all areas puts me an in unparalleled position to take over the reins of property appraiser.

Citrus Chronicle Debate that NEVER WAS!

In Citrus Chronicle Debate that NEVER WAS!, EYE ON CITRUS on kp26 at 312019

Citrus County Chronicle put on a Debate Between the Candidates at the Key Training Center TV Channel 49 WYKE on June 19 2007. It was called "Live Mike" but it was neither Live nor was it ever seen and it was never reported on in the Citrus County Chronicle newspaper. It’s a sad commentary that started with my candidacy in 2007 and has followed through my years in attempting to run in 2018 for the Citrus County Commission as an NPA candidate and now that I’m a Republican and running for the Citrus County Property Appraiser’s Office the modus operandi continues as they’re coverage or rather lack of it follows my efforts to become the property appraiser with my unparalleled experience with 32 years working with Citrus County, 18 years as a private contractor with the county and 14 years in the Property Appraiser’s Office retiring in 2017.

Donate to my campaign thru DONORBOX https://bit.ly/2QavcNT

The One War That the Human Species Can’t Lose

In EYEONCITRUS.COM, The One War That the Human Species Can’t Lose on kp24 at 292023

Glacier.

By Robin Wright

February 20, 2020

The ice in Antarctica is melting six times faster than it did forty years ago, resulting in more calving of icebergs—with existential stakes.Photograph by Robin Wright

Sign up for Bill McKibben’s new Climate Crisis newsletter and get weekly updates from inside the climate movement.

On the final day of my expedition to Antarctica last year, ten of us set out on a Zodiac to tour dozens of icebergs in nature’s wondrous ocean museum. The frozen sculptures glistened in exquisite hues of blue and cyan; iceberg colors vary by the density of air bubbles. Each was formed after snapping off an ancient glacier. The iceberg that sank the Titanic in the Atlantic, in 1912, was considered a mere “bergy bit,” or a smaller piece of floating ice; it melted within a couple of years. The ones we saw around Antarctica were massive. Occasionally, we spotted blubbery elephant seals (which can weigh more than four tons) napping on icebergs, or Adélie penguins (so named by a French explorer, for his wife) leaping among them, or a Humpback whale’s blow unnervingly nearby. As we headed back to the ship, the naturalist steering the Zodiac suddenly turned off the motor. “Listen,” he said. Antarctica is usually a powerfully silent continent except for the gusting winds or the lapping waves on its coastline. He put his finger up, signalling to wait for it. We sat motionless. A thundering crack then ripped through the air, echoing across the water until it felt like it was going off inside my head. We watched a towering slice of the continent break off and crash into the Southern Ocean. It felt cataclysmic.

For almost a half century, I’ve covered wars, revolutions and uprisings on four continents, many for years on end. I’ve always been an outside observer watching as others killed each other. I lamented the loss of human life—and the warring parties’ self-destructive practices—from an emotional distance. In Antarctica, I saw war through a different prism. And I was the enemy. “Humans will be but a blip in the span of Earth’s history,” Wayne Ranney, a naturalist and geologist on the expedition, told me. “The only question is how long the blip will be.”

Last week, the temperature in Antarctica hit almost seventy degrees—the hottest in recorded history. It wasn’t a one-day fluke. Famed for its snowscapes, the Earth’s coldest, wildest, windiest, highest, and most mysterious continent has been experiencing a heat wave. A few days earlier, an Antarctic weather station recorded temperatures in the mid-sixties. It was colder in Washington, D.C., where I live. Images of northern Antarctica captured vast swaths of barren brown terrain devoid of ice and with only small puddle-like patches of snow.

The problem is not whether a new record was set, “it’s the longer-term trend that makes those records more likely to happen more often,” John Nielsen-Gammon, the director of the Texas Center for Climate Studies at Texas A. & M. University, told me this week. “It’s sort of like a forest where trees are constantly growing and trees are dying, but if they start dying faster than they can grow back, then you eventually lose the forest,” he said. “The same thing applies to glaciers. Glaciers flow out to the ocean and break off, but if they break off faster then the glacier retreats and you lose ice—and then the sea level goes up around the world.”

The iceberg that I watched break off from Antarctica was part of a process called calving. It’s normal and a necessary step in nature’s cycle, except that it’s now happening a lot faster and in larger chunks—with existential stakes. The ice in Antarctica is now melting six times faster than it did forty years ago, Eric Rignot, an Earth scientist at the University of California, Irvine, and a co-author of a major study of the continent’s ice health, told me.

This month, an iceberg measuring more than a hundred square miles—the size of the Mediterranean island of Malta, or twice the size of Washington, D.C.—broke off the Pine Island Glacier (lovingly known as PIG, for short) in West Antarctica. It then broke up into smaller “pig-lets,” according to the European Space Agency, which tracked them by satellite. The largest piglet was almost forty square miles. Rest of  Article HERE

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